CODING BOOTCAMPS: REMOTE FULL-TIME & PART-TIME

Join our London coding bootcamps remotely from anywhere and learn to code professionally: live software-engineering training & career-change support. Make the jump.

Our coding bootcamps are part-time or full-time programmes of in-depth software-engineering training & optional career-change support. They are live and interactive and delivered to you remotely by an instructor via Zoom.

Learn to code professionally to become a developer, upskill, or build your own products.

Upcoming Bootcamps:

Part-Time JavaScript: Monday 2nd November
Full-Time Full-Stack: Monday 18th January
Part-time Full-Stack: Tuesday 19th January

Coding bootcamp London, become a professional full-stack web developer

Full-Stack Coding Bootcamp

Learn to code with our most comprehensive bootcamp that provides everything you need to make the jump from little or no coding experience to developing and deploying enterprise-grade software to a professional standard. Learn to leverage the full client-server model (browser, API’s, servers & databases) to build attractive and performant sites and web apps.

Duration: 30 weeks part-time or 12 weeks full-time.

Coding bootcamp London, become a professional front-end web developer

Front-End Coding Bootcamp

The Front-End Bootcamp is the Full-Stack Bootcamp minus the portion which relates to servers, databases, building your own API’s and DevOps. This bootcamp would be suitable for you if you wanted to focus your career on building user interfaces. No previous experience required.

Duration: 22 weeks part-time or 9 weeks full-time.

Coding bootcamp London, become a professional front-end web developer

JavaScript Coding Bootcamp

This is the programming portion of the Full-Stack Bootcamp. If you already know HTML and CSS but want to know how to professionally build the logic that powers both the front-end of your application (including using React) and the back end (including using Express in Node.js), then this bootcamp is for you.

Duration: 17.5 weeks part-time or 7 weeks full-time.

How the bootcamps overlap:

The Jump - how our three bootcamps overlap

Why choose us?

Total support and dedication: The Jump is our baby and showing people how to code professionally is our passion. Our promise to you is that we’ll be with you every step of the way and we’ll work just as hard as you, to get you where you want to be.

Access more opportunities: Many bootcamps teach Ruby. We don’t. We develop your edge by focusing you on a far more popular and in-demand language than Ruby - JavaScript (For every Ruby developer role there are between 4 and 6 JavaScript developer roles).

We use your time wisely: Many bootcamps teach 2 programming languages. We don’t. In reality, bootcamps don’t give you enough time to get good at 2 languages, so we teach you to be really good at 1 language (JavaScript) rather than average at 2.

Reduced financial impact: We cost less than many other bootcamps. Our PART-TIME coding bootcamps mean you can train without having to quit your job & lose your income. We let you spread the cost by paying in instalments or using 3rd party finance providers.

Get results faster: When there’s so much to know and it evolves so quickly, where do you start? Knowing the big picture and the pitfalls enables us to help you cut through the confusion & condense into several weeks what would otherwise take years to learn.

Relevant and current: We’re not out-of-date academics or rookies, our instructors are experienced and practicing industry professionals who work with the latest tech, so they know what industry wants and what’s valuable now, not 5 years ago.

Testimonial

Kyle, Front End Web Developer
‘James’s way of breaking down difficult concepts, his easy and relaxed manner, and his incredible wealth of knowledge helped rapidly accelerate my learning. I now have the confidence to approach the job market knowing I have been taught sound principles and practices.’
- Kyle, Front-End Web Developer

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a coding bootcamp worth it?

To answer this question properly, you need to look at a number of dimensions:

— What result you want from the coding bootcamp?
— Will the bootcamp work with you to ensure you get what you need to be able to achieve that result?
— What are you having to sacrifice to enrol in that bootcamp?
— What are your alternate options and how do they compare?

Our students regularly tell us that The Jump’s coding bootcamps are definitely worth it because:

A) It’s a faster and more comprehensive way for you to properly learn and apply the relevant concepts that you need in order to code to a professional standard.

B) Our bootcamps provide a combination of a focused, well structured programme and hands on support from an experienced professional developer who is committed to your success. As a result, we can cut through the confusion and condense several years of self-study using online courses, into several weeks. We also provide the dedicated career-change support you need to make the jump into the industry, if that’s your goal.

C) Our part-time bootcamps mean that you don’t need to sacrifice:

— Your job and your income while you train full-time.
— The quality of your learning by compressing it into 12 weeks. Instead you can take more time to play with concepts and embed your learning.

Not only does this massively reduce the financial impact, it also significantly widens access to those who want to access professional-grade tuition but who are not in a position to quit their jobs.

D) Traditional routes, such as university degrees, have been heavily criticised for being devoid of commercial reality, overly theoretical and failing to provide in-depth technical understanding or the skills needed for a career in the sector. (Digital Skills Crisis Report) They also take far longer and are far more expensive.

How much is a coding bootcamp?

There are a few things to consider when working out the cost of a coding bootcamp, such as:

— What is the actual amount I need to pay inclusive of any interest?
— Over what timeframe do I need to pay it - some bootcamps require you to pay up front.
— Do I need to quit my job and lose my income to train. The average full-time coding bootcamp lasts 12 weeks, plus at least 4 weeks to look for and secure a job. The average non-tech salary in London is circa £41K. Therefore the average full-time student loses circa £12,600 income during this period, which should be factored into the cost of learning.
— Realistically, when will I next be paid bearing in mind that even when you start a job, you may have to wait another month before you receive your salary.

Coding bootcamps can vary significantly in price. As an example, as per Saturday 8th August 2020 a quick inspection of the market indicated that the following bootcamps were priced roughly as follows:

Flatiron: $15,000 (Online Software Engineering)
Codeworks: £9,400 (12-week Software Engineering Immersive)
General Assembly: £9,000 / Remote $14,950 (Online Software Engineering Immersive)
Makers: £8,000 to be paid prior to your start date (12-week remote course)
Le Wagon: £6,500 to be paid prior to your start date / £7,000 if you pay in instalments (9-week online Full-Time Web Development course)
The Jump:

  • £7,500 for our Full-Stack Bootcamp (both part-time (30 weeks) and Full-time (12 weeks)
  • £6,000 for our Front-End Bootcamp (both part-time (22 weeks) and Full-time (9 weeks))
  • £4,999 for our JavaScript Bootcamp (both part-time (17.5 weeks and Full-time (7 weeks)).

All of The Jump's coding bootcamps can be paid in instalments and our we also offer a range of additional 3rd party finance options to suit you.

(For up-to-date information on the aforementioned schools, please visit their websites)

Whilst the actual price of the bootcamp should be factored into your decision making, you should also think of the wider context of the overall financial impact that joining the bootcamp will have on you.

Will a coding bootcamp get you a job?

You can absolutely make the jump into the industry as a developer - as students at The Jump have demonstrated - but attending a coding bootcamp does not guarantee you a job.

As the saying goes, there are only two guarantees in life: death and taxes. If a bootcamp guarantees you a job, you should definitely ask what their definition of a job is, what duration you are guaranteed to be employed for, what you’ll actually be doing in the job that they are guaranteeing, how much work is involved, how much the job pays, and under what circumstances that guarantee is valid or not. As, developers are in high demand, our recommendation is to focus on other aspects rather than the “guarantee” of a job.

To give yourself the best chance of finding the right job for you after the bootcamp, we’d recommend asking the following questions of yourself, the bootcamp and the market:

What kind of developer do I want to be? Python for instance is closely associated with data science and machine learning whereas JavaScript is the number one language for websites and web applications. (Additionally, bear in mind that positions for machine learning devs will often require a degree (if not a masters/phd) in a quantitative subject).

What tech is in most demand for that kind of developer role? (e.g. for every Ruby developer role there are between 4 and 6 JavaScript Developer roles. React is the most in-demand of the Front-End JavaScript libraries/frameworks)

How much can you realistically learn in the timeframe of the bootcamp? (Some bootcamps teach multiple languages like JavaScript and Python. The Jump avoids doing this on the basis that there are limits to your absorption rate and you only have a finite and amount of learning time on a bootcamp, so the more languages you try to learn, the less depth of understanding you’ll have with those languages. We would rather you were really good at one language than average at two languages)

Which bootcamps are teaching that tech? (The Jump doesn’t teach Ruby, we teach JavaScript across both the front end (including react) and the back end (including Node.JS and Express)

How much experience does the instructor have in those technologies? Our instructor, James, has been a full-stack developer using these technologies as they have evolved for over 13 years.

How much experience do they have in teaching those technologies? James has been teaching for over 6 years and previously taught JavaScript at General Assembly.

How much support will you receive from the bootcamp? (The Jump caps its class size at 15 so that we can dedicate support to each student whenever they need it throughout the bootcamp. Some bootcamps have 50 plus students on each cohort)

How dedicated are the bootcamp’s staff to helping you make the jump to where you want to be? Are they working at the bootcamp for an income or do they run the school and is this their passion?

Finding the answers to these questions will help you choose which bootcamp is going to work best for helping you make the jump to becoming an industry ready developer.

How much do coders make an hour?

Adzuna: London average JavaScript Developer salary is £66,000

CWJobs: London average JavaScript Developer salary is £70,000

Tech Nation: London average Full-Stack Engineer salary £50,000 - £74,000

Do companies hire coding bootcamp graduates?

Yes, absolutely. The UK has a shortage of tech skills with some estimates projecting that there are somewhere in the region of 800,000 unfilled vacancies.

Whilst Corona Virus has had an economic impact, tech is the most buoyant and confident sector so there are still vacancies.

Bootcamp graduates who have properly learnt the tech skills that the market is demanding are well placed to be hired by companies.

Students of The Jump who have chosen to find new developer roles have realised how closely our syllabus matches what the market is looking for.

Can you fail a coding bootcamp?

The Jump has a policy that we won’t leave you behind on any of our coding bootcamps, providing you are putting the effort in to learn. We recognise that people learn in different ways and at different speeds, so we’ll work just as hard as you to get you to where you want to be.

Are coding bootcamps for beginners?

At The Jump, students on our coding bootcamps range in experience from those who have never seen a code editor before to those who have done a number of online programmes and have hit a wall, through to tech professionals looking to learn these powerful and valuable skills. We balance the needs of the different experience levels and make sure that everyone at every level gets real value out of the training so that they can make the jump to where they want to be.

Of the three different coding bootcamps that The Jump runs - Full-Stack, Front-End and JavaScript - only the JavaScript Bootcamp requires pre-existing knowledge of HTML and CSS. That’s because JavaScript, as it applies to the front end of the client-server model, is used to create an interactive user interface that responds to a user. User interfaces are structured and styled using HTML and CSS, so to manipulate a user interface requires a pre-existing understanding of both HTML and CSS.

Does coding require math?

If you dreaded maths at school, then don’t worry, to be a Full-Stack Web Developer, there is very little maths that you need to know and our coding bootcamps will go over the basics that you need. The kind of maths that you use will be percentages (e.g. what percentage of the viewport’s width do you want an element to be), comparisons (e.g. is something more than, less than or equal to something else), basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

How long does a coding bootcamp take?

The training for most bootcamps lasts around 12-weeks full-time but The Jump runs both part-time and full-time Full-Stack, Front-End and JavaScript bootcamps with the following durations:

Part-Time:
Full-Stack: 30-weeks
Front-End: 22-weeks
JavaScript: 17.5-weeks

Full-Time:
Full-Stack: 12-weeks
Front-End: 9-weeks
JavaScript: 7-weeks

It is worth remembering that if your time during the bootcamp is spent learning and embedding your new tech skills and then using them to build things, then there will be limited time during the bootcamp to apply for roles. That means there will also be an amount of time that you will need to dedicate to finding a new role after the bootcamp. Once you’ve found a job, it could be up to a month before you receive your first months pay - so a 3 month bootcamp can easily turn into 6 months without an income - it’s worth factoring this in when budgeting.

Do you need a degree for a coding bootcamp?

Nope - you don’t need one to become a developer so you don’t need one to join our coding bootcamps. The only requirements we have are:

Commitment: That you’ll put in the effort to learn and practice what we’re teaching you.
English: That you can understand English to a level that allows you to understand the concepts we’re explaining
Learning difficulties and colour blindness: That you let us know in advance so we can understand your needs.

If you’re still not sure then take it from GitHub’s former Co-Founder/CEO, Tom Preston-Werner

https://twitter.com/mojombo/status/1291430990284337152

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